The Secret Dangers of Tampons and Pads

deadlytampons Natural Health

If you are a woman who still uses tampons or menstrual pads during your cycle, you need to read this! There is a serious health danger you may not ever have heard of, and it could be putting you at risk. Keep reading to learn about the potential harm your pads and tampons could be causing your body

The Problems with Pads

Due to the chemical processes used to create sanitary napkins, there’s a risk that women who use menstrual pads can experience irritation and infection. If a woman does experience a vaginal infection from using a pad, she may experience the following symptoms during her menstrual cycle:

  • Slight fever and headache

  • Itchy skin

  • Cervical inflammation

  • External inflammation of the vagina

  • White discharge

  • Searing heat or pain

  • Endometrial inflammation

These symptoms could be further aggravated by the chemicals used to make your pads white and appealing for mass audiences. Chemicals like bleach and toxins are frequently used in the manufacturing of menstrual pads, and there’s some risk that a chemical residue could linger even through the production process, putting your health at risk.

Tampon Dangers

Using tampons instead of pads isn’t a free pass from health problems, either. In fact, tampons are actually more dangerous to a woman’s health. Consider some of the common problems associated with tampons:

  • Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS): The biggest problem with using tampons, TSS affects women under 30 (especially teenagers) most. However, any woman using tampons can get TSS. Over 60% of TSS fatalities happen in women ages 15 to 24, and nearly 98% of these victims are white. Once you suffer TSS, you’re more likely to suffer miscarriages, loss of limbs and hair, severe organ damage, miscarriages, and many other severe health complications.

  • Synthetic fibers: Like pads, the synthetic fibers that make up tampons have been bleached with harsh chemicals. There is a risk that the processes used to treat tampons could be dangerous to the user.

  • Environmental effects: In addition to risking the health of the women who use tampons, the manufacturing process of these menstrual aids causes damage to the environment. The toxic byproducts of producing tampons include poisons like dioxin and furan.

What’s the Solution?

Since the Tampon and Pad industry is a $718 million dollar market, it’s unlikely legislation will pass anytime soon that will make these products safer. In the meantime, you may want to consider the following alternatives:

  • Menstrual cup: These flexible silicone cups are reusable and safe. Essentially, they are inserted into the vagina and catch all of the menstrual fluid. The cup is then emptied every 12 hours or so. While this may seem a little gross at first, it’s a much safer solution than inserted chemically treated synthetic cloth into your vagina. Plus, since a single cup can be reused again and again, it’s very cost effective, too.

  • Reusable pads: Another option is to purchase reusable pads. Like washable diapers, you simply wash these pads and use them every time you have your cycle. They’re also cost-effective and safe for the environment.

It’s important to keep your most sensitive parts safe. If you use tampons or pads, consider making the change now.


34 Comments on The Secret Dangers of Tampons and Pads

  1. Billie Mae Boyett Gollnick

    This is hilarious! I used tampons from age 12 'til age 80 and was grateful for the convenience. My mother born in a far earlier era made her pads from cloth and had to wash them for re-use. Enough of this foolishness in order to promote a new financial interest… there may be a few gullibles out here.

  2. Angela Grateful Dodson

    For about a year now, I have used toilet paper. a small folded and held in place peice of toilet paper works well to absorb stuff and is more sanitary then peeing on the tampon string, etc I also have less cramps.

  3. Jennifer Taunton

    I myself have been using reusable pads and a cup for about a year now. They're not inconvenient at all. I always have them, they're actually much cleaner than the disposables, and way more comfortable. Wish I had started using them from the beginning.

  4. I make reusable menstrual pads and what surprised me most was that women would come to me, asking for the softest fabric because their periods were terrible and it got so bad "down there." I can think of at least 5 times when the person has come back to me in tears after their first cycle using cloth pads, because they realized it wasn't their period, but the disposable pads (or rather, likely, the chemicals in the pad.) The soreness, redness, painful itchy periods were gone. I, too, have gone from having debilitating cramps every month to almost no cramping at all.

    It does sound gross to many people, but I handle my cloth almost as little as I would handle a disposable. They are shaped like disposables, with an easy snap rather than the garters and straps of old.

    I see nothing different on the pad than if I was changing a disposable. My washer and detergent are made to clean away the most disgusting germs and stains (and really, let's face it – I'd rather see blood than poop smears, considering what is in both.) I throw everything in a storage bag, empty the bag into the washer and then next time I handle my pads they are clean again.
    Need more reasons? http://weeessentials.com/blog/?p=5

  5. Cloth pads and cups are disgusting huh? Well, try the burning, itching rash caused by a disposable pad nesting against your lady bits while you sit in a smelly, plastic-encased, chemical stew of your own blood and a plethora of unnamed chemicals? Or, maybe that soggy, urine-soaked tampon string stuck to your thigh? Or, wait…the smell of that garbage bin after you toss a few used pads in there for disposal? Grossed out yet? Luckily, I don't have to deal with any of that anymore. Cups are made of silicone or TPE and it's the same type of material used for various SAFE medical implants. It doesn't effect your ph or harvest bacteria OR draw out all your natural moisture like a tampon and…wait for it…you can even sleep naked on your period! *wink* And, like most love affairs, it is awkward at first but so, so worth it in the end! Cloth pads are simply a revelation; yes, you wash them and reuse them…*gasp*…just like those undies and sheets you accidentally bleed on every mth and still manage to use again with no ill effects! No, they DO NOT smell and aren't any harder to clean than the rest of your laundry. I DARE you to find out what you're missing…those who knock it should try it JUST ONCE and see won't it change your life! ;-)

  6. Dana Conrad

    Hahaha, people who use the "safe options" don't mock your view, the double standard is hilarious.

  7. Dana Conrad

    There are options that are also disposable. I have a friend who just tried it, and she's not into this stuff and LOVES it. Softcup.

  8. Eleanora Fry

    Tampons and pads can be awkward, too. Noisy wrappers in a public bathroom stall, having to leave said wrappers at your boyfriends house, smelling up your bathroom with used pads? None of those are awkward? Like the saying goes, "don't knock it before you try it!"

    Don't wanna spend thirty bucks on an "awkward" silicone cup? Go to your local drugstore and look for Instead soft cups. Same concept but a little different, as they are disposable and you can safely have sex with them in. Can't do that with tampons! Give them a try. They may surprise you.

  9. Bree Farmer

    well I'm 16 and I use these, they are NOT gross and are WAY better than disposables! They have made my periods less painful, shorter, lighter and much more comfortable. I like the fact that you can sterilise them rather than put a bacteria laden disposable against your vagina. There's nothing gross about your periods, its natural and only seen as disgusting because that's what the large pad and tampon manufactures have told us (btw their owned by men)!

  10. Laura A. Ocasio

    I am going to try the cup. I have had children and my last was born via C-section following a tubal. My cycles are horrible..heavy with a lot of pain. I am tired of having to use the biggest pad and tampon to keep from having accidents. I find it funny that there are comments about how "gross" it is to use a cup. Well, it is "gross" being a women during that time of month regardless! Correct me if I am wrong but, I am pretty sure you have to pull out a blood soaked tampon with your fingers and blood does get on them, right?! Um, yes it does! You do wash your hands afterwards, right?! The ridiculousness of some grown women!

  11. I've tried over 20 types of reusable pads and they all worked well (except some are harder to wash). I picked the brand that I liked the most and have been using them for over 7 years now. The only time I don't use them is when I travel abroad. And when I use the disposable types, I get itchy skin immediately. Pretty scary to put all those poisonous chemicals on your skin.

  12. Whispering Willows Nichole Wilde

    Vicki I beg to differ… My first time using a tampon I had it in for 2 hours and had to be rushed to the ER in convulsions…

  13. Peter Banga

    The entire "disposable" industry has obviously got their own fear talon agenda into the vast majority of people. Not that I'm an expert in this subject, but let's face it… anything chemically processed is going to have some sort of impact on a % of people's natural chemistry. I used and washed cloth diapers for my daughter form day one (to draw a similar parallel) and she learned to use the potty at 1.5 years of age. I'm curious if PMS and menopause might be easier to deal with if people use chemical-free alternatives from day 1.

  14. Wow! I did one of my random train-of-thought searches about the dangers of tampon use & found myself here. I'm 34 & have been using pads & tampons since I was 12. I learned about TSS early on but it was the only danger ever mentioned. I have MS & a # of other health problems and have recently begun switching to holistic options for my health. My periods are extremely painful, often followed by infections & having an auto-immune disease, my body has become extremely sensitive to things that never bothered me b4 my diagnosis. I never knew there were other options for pads/tampons. Well, except one. When I was in college, I saw an insertable cup advertised on TV (can't recall the name) that boasted wearability during sex. I tried it based on that alone. It was a thick rubber ring w/a soft, flexible "cup" attached & it hurt like hell! When I finally got up the nerve to try intercourse w/it in, I didn't tell my bf but worried he could feel it the entire time. Afterward, he jumps out of my bed, screaming, "YOU'RE BLEEDING! OH MY GOD, THERE'S SO MUCH BLOOD!" LMAO!!! It was SOOO mortifying! Needless to say, I gave up the cup! I also remember having a lot of trouble (not to mention PAIN) w/removal, followed by a huge bloody mess on my hands. I'm interested to learn about how the cup option mentioned on this site compares to my past experience. All jokes aside, nothing matters more than my health & I'm a lover of this beautiful planet we're so blessed to call our home. Any changes I can make to benefit us both are changes I can get behind — w/the right information, that is. On this subject, it's where I'm lacking. Any help would be so appreciated! Thanks!

  15. Wow! I did one of my random train-of-thought searches about the dangers of tampon use & found myself here. I'm 34 & have been using pads & tampons since I was 12. I learned about TSS early on but it was the only danger ever mentioned. I have MS & a # of other health problems and have recently begun switching to holistic options for my health. My periods are extremely painful, often followed by infections & having an auto-immune disease, my body has become extremely sensitive to things that never bothered me b4 my diagnosis. I never knew there were other options for pads/tampons. Well, except one. When I was in college, I saw an insertable cup advertised on TV (can't recall the name) that boasted wearability during sex. I tried it based on that alone. It was a thick rubber ring w/a soft, flexible "cup" attached & it hurt like hell! When I finally got up the nerve to try intercourse w/it in, I didn't tell my bf but worried he could feel it the entire time. Afterward, he jumps out of my bed, screaming, "YOU'RE BLEEDING! OH MY GOD, THERE'S SO MUCH BLOOD!" LMAO!!! It was SOOO mortifying! Needless to say, I gave up the cup! I also remember having a lot of trouble (not to mention PAIN) w/removal, followed by a huge bloody mess on my hands. I'm interested to learn about how the cup option mentioned on this site compares to my past experience. All jokes aside, nothing matters more than my health & I'm a lover of this beautiful planet we're so blessed to call our home. Any changes I can make to benefit us both are changes I can get behind — w/the right information, that is. On this subject, it's where I'm lacking. Any help would be so appreciated! Thanks!

  16. ChaCha Morris

    Up next. Labeling the chemicals inside of pads. This reminds me of the mom that wanted the sugar content labeled on her babies formula.

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